News

    News

    The Center for Water Efficient Landscaping has joined a nation-wide research study evaluating the social, economic, and environmental barriers and benefits of transitioning from high input to low input grasses. The goal is to understand how different campus members evaluate the opportunities and barriers for utilizing low-input grasses in their efforts for more sustainable land management — meeting environmental, economic, and social objectives.
    Dr. Joanna Endter-Wada received the 2018 Award for Outstanding Service in the Academic Sector from the American Water Resources Association Utah Section. The award was presented at the section’s 46th Annual Water Resources Conference, which was held in Salt Lake City at the S.J. Quinney School of Law, University of Utah on May 16, 2018.
    Ms. Paige Boyle, recently admitted to USU as a Center for Water Efficient Landscaping Fellow, has also earned a Presidential Doctoral Research Fellowship from the university.
    March 14-16th at Jordan Valley Conservation Garden Park Through the Qualified Water-Efficient Landscaper (QWEL) Program, local landscape professionals learn how to become water efficient in landscape design, maintenance, and operation, to make a positive impact in reducing landscape water demand.
    The Utah Nursery and Landscape Association (UNLA) Green Conference is an annual gathering of green industry professionals with talks covering a variety of topics related to landscapes, irrigation, design, nursery and greenhouse management, turfgrass and arboriculture. CWEL presented multiple talks at the 2018 Utah Green Industry Conference in Sandy, Utah in January.
    Horticulturist Dr. Larry Rupp is always on the lookout for promising plants for the low-water landscape. The latest four covers of Native Plants Journal showcase pictures of plants from his travels and attention to plants in their native habitats. As the associate editor, he also penned an essay on the difference between ‘looking for’ and ‘seeing’ plants.
    Larry Rupp discusses selecting native trees and shrubs for low water landscapes with USU Extension Forestry’s monthly webinar series.
    Another great year at Water Smart Innovations Conference in Las Vegas! Dr. Joanna Endter-Wada presented her study with Weber Basin Water Conservancy District, Metering Non-Potable Water: 5 -Year Study of Urban Irrigation Efficiency. Dr. Paul Johnson presented You Can't Play Soccer In a Perennial Bed: The Case for Turf In Sustainable Landscapes.
    Join professionals, scientists conservation specialists, and others working to create a sustainable water future in this two day event, May 11th and 12th, 2017. Keynote speaker is Steven Clyde, Vice President and Director of Clyde Snow Attorneys at Law.
    Necrotic ring spot (Ophiosphaerella korrae) is the most commonly diagnosed fungal turfgrass disease by the Utah State University Plant Pest Diagnostic Laboratory. CWEL's Kelly Kopp and Paul Harris release a research report evaluating Ring to GREEN product by GreenMaster Distributing, LLC for the control of necrotic ring spot in turfgrass.
    The Center for Water Efficient Landscaping has both research and outreach responsibilities, taking valuable research outcomes and working with local communities to educate Utah citizens and make a positive impact on water conservation efforts in our state. CWEL has made progress on the following projects in 2016:
    CWEL’s Kelly Kopp joins the ‘Bringing Water to Life’ podcast. Kelly discusses turf-removal programs and how the best way to start conserving water in the landscape is to first irrigate efficiently.
    M.S. or Ph.D. research assistantships are available with the Center for Water Efficient Landscaping at Utah State University to study urban landscapes and urban water management.
    The Slow the Flow Water Check Program is in full swing along the Wasatch Front offering free irrigation efficiency assessments. A considerable amount of water can be saved through efficient irrigation as a typical Utah homeowner applies twice as much water as necessary to their landscape. The Deseret News reports on the Water Check Program.
    'Smart' irrigation controllers monitor the local environment to determine how much water is necessary to sufficiently water the landscape without wasting water. Weber Basin Water Conservancy District offers rebate for homeowners to install.